Thursday, July 27, 2017

Throwback Thursday - The Notebook

Phyllis and Mario 1940
To clear up some confusion, the Notebook passages posted on Throwback Thursday were written by my father and found by me after he passed away. They were his attempt to tell the family history. He was in his late 80s or early 90s when he wrote them. Today's chapter:

And in between my brother, Mario, was called incorrigible and my father had him put in a state institution in Holyoke. [ed: My mother told me Mario had been sent to the Lyman School for Boys in Westboro] I went with my mother to visit him. Everyone asked how he [ed: his father] could do this? Since Mario did not commit any crimes, etc. Even in the institution, the people in charge could not understand why he was there. They kept him for six months and then sent him home. School was not for him, but he became a hard worker. He got a job with an oil man assisting him with deliveries. He was Mario and he was a good brother and good-hearted. My cousin Raymond, Zia Angelina's son, called him a diamond in the rough.

At this point, I would say that my sister and brothers and in-laws were very good to me and loved me.

Mario did not spend much time in school. He married young and Phyllis was a good find for him. But for a while, it looked like it would not last. He came home one night and brought a wedding gift he had received with him and his clothes. The marriage was off.

Father stepped in and he told him you take your things with you and you return to your wife. There's not going to be any break-up. He did as he was told.  [ed: Mario and his wife were married for 56 years when Mario passed away in 1996]

11 comments:

  1. Now that's a story that would make a good novel or film. Love the photo, too. How wonderful to have your Dad's old writings.
    Have a great day, hugs, Valerie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. His writings are like listening to him over a cup of tea.

      Delete
  2. I remember your father telling about Mario and the Lyman School before. It was a shame how they treated Mario. Of course, he was not just vulnerable, but pliable, too, as proven when he returned to his wife. Always good to read your dad's stories of his young life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dad and his brother, Mario, were tough kids. Had a reputation around the neighborhood. I'm sure my grandfather was worried,they would end up leading a life of crime. Fortunately for my father, Charlie took him under his wing and was a big influence in my father's life. Dad lived with Charlie and his family for awhile.

      Also with the Depression on, hard to keep 2 teen boys fed as well as 3 younger children. Dad was taken care of by the Arnolds. I think the Lyman School was Grandpa's way to scare Mario straight. Maybe in my grandfather's mind, at least Mario would have a roof over his head and would be provided for. My grandfather struggled to provide for his family during the Depression.

      Delete
  3. 'His writings are like listening to him over a cup of tea.' That's the best review I have EVER read, anywhere! That touched me more than the story itself.

    ReplyDelete
  4. my gran pa was sent away to a seminary because he was supposedly "bad" though I never asked what he did or if it was a multitude of things....not sure he would have admitted it anyway !!! I'm glad dad had the courage to tell Mario to hang in there and stick with it.... ♥♥ 56 years is a thing of the past; you don't see that in this day and age anymore ~~ !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe their willingness to work through problems also made this generation The Greatest Generation.

      Delete
  5. A wonderful advice that saved Mario and changed history no doubt. Warm greetings to you.

    ReplyDelete