Thursday, July 20, 2017

Throwback Thursday - The Notebooks

image from
https://www.mspmlc.org/history/msp-history-1900-1949
To clear up some confusion, the Notebook passages posted on Throwback Thursday were written by my father and found by me after he passed away. They were his attempt to tell the family history. He was in his late 80s or early 90s when he wrote them. Today's chapter:

It still was no picnic [ed: working at the Center under Nelson] I know that I was able to make enough money to be able to buy my books, ring which I eventually gave to The Brother. And I also had a small amount to be able to take in a movie. I did not sit for a picture for the class book. All I did was submit something and let that go.

While things were going ok at home, my father was still struggling and my mother had her hands full. And he also had during this period he began drinking still feeling bad about his alleged friends.

If he enjoyed anything it was listening to the operas on the radio. Other than that he was somewhat [ed: sentence not finished]

Uncle Vincent was instrumental in getting him a job as a tailor with the state police. He repaired the uniforms or tailored them and it required that he work at the Framingham barracks and he would come home on weekends. At night he would either go out with the police in their cruiser or with either or both of his brothers. [ed: His brother, Joe, a barber had his own barbershop and lived in Framingham. His brother Alfred, a cobbler, had his own shop and lived in nearby Wellesley]

He also during the time before he got the job began making friends with your mother's people. And he did not have anything to do with his own again. Since some were related he would at least acknowledge but he would not visit them or have them over to the house. He changed personality and mother did not sing anymore either.

She went out to work and her life got better. She began to be herself again. And it wasn't hard for her to make friends. Her attitude was wonderful and with all her troubles, she was still able to encourage people. Tomorrow would be a better day

11 comments:

  1. This must have been difficult for your father to write but it's wonderful he did...a great legacy for you and your kids.

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    1. He never spoke about his dad turning to alcohol. It's probably why my Dad didn't really drink beyond a glass of wine for a special occasion.

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  2. So sad your dad had to go through that period in his life. It sounds like a rather tragic time for him and his mother, too.

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    1. A tragic time for all those who lived through The Depression

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  3. Great chapter for the day, and a solemn one to read.

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  4. I always enjoy the notebooks. Its a great link to your family past, and I wish I had something like that for my family. :) Hugs-Erika

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    1. Yes, the notebooks are a treasure. Though I have heard some of the stories, there's things that surprise me

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  5. now there's a familar scenario, having nothing to do with family and a personality change or two....I shan't get started.... or I'll never quit ~~~~~~ ♥♥

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  6. Your notebook readings are so interesting CJ! Such a tragic hard time for your father at this time!

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