Thursday, July 6, 2017

Throwback Thursday - The Notebooks

To clear up some confusion, the Notebook passages posted on Throwback Thursday were written by my father and found by me after he passed away. They were his attempt to tell the family history. He was in his late 80s or early 90s when he wrote them. Today's chapter:

Of course, Charlie Arnold still was showing interest in me and he decided that he would pick me as the trainee volunteer headed to become a social worker down the road.

I passed into the 3rd year class and during the Summer, I got a job from him. But not at the Center. He had bought a house in East Boston and he had a lot of things to do with the grounds, etc. Of course, I think that after my first year at the playschool, he wanted to make sure that I wouldn't spend the Summer pestering the teachers. He paid me much more than I got from the Center. And the projects were fun. He showed me how to mix cement and he let me pour it in a square area that would direct water from the roof into this basin and down the hill.

Also, I did think that Doris [ed: Charlie's wife] might need some help with. She also saw that I had breaks and made lunch for us. And on some weekends, they would take me with them to Lynn where I was introduced to Chinese foods as he had bought himself a used car, Oldsmobile, and we had fun. On one Saturday night, we were ging to Lynn and got in a short downpour. And at one spot the car dropped a little and hit a good size amount of water that hit the hood and windshield. I was sitting in the front seat with him and Doris was in the back seat.

As he came out of the waterfall, I aid would this car acted more like a battleship. He laughed and said just about. Maybe we should go back and do it again. That's when Doris who was quiet all this time. She said one word. Charles. And he replied I guess we won't go back. And as quick as the rain came, it let up. And we did have a nice time.

Charlie inspected my concrete finish and he was amazed. He said, "Considering your episodes, etc. you can when you want, really do a good job. I'm impressed." And after that, I got more interesting things to do around the house and yard. The house was on a hill and the yard behind it went down a pretty good grade. And got the idea that we could terrace the rear yard.

Also from the location of his house, one could also look from the back of the house and see the [ed: horse] races at Suffolk Downs. Although it was a good distance from the house, we could hear the roar of the crowd but in a soft way.

And as the Summer ended, I would go on Saturdays during my Junior year [ed: high school]. Amazingly, I buckled down at school. And began raising my grades. Thursdays and Fridays I had two study periods at the end of both days. And if I got on the Honor Roll, I could get out from school early and if the second to the last teacher signed off. I could get out after lunch. So my second month's marks put me on the Honor Roll, all A's and high B's and I maintained that the rest of the year.

Also every Saturday, Charlie invited some volunteers and people that worked at the Center and I was included. We had a lot of fun playing Monopoly and other games and also cocoa, cookies, etc. I also got home late from these affairs. And as long as I was going to the Arnold's my parents allowed the late hours.

10 comments:

  1. Had to laugh at Charlie who told your dad he could do good work if he put his mind to it. Seems that's a lesson all children should learn. Nice that your dad got paid for his efforts, too.

    After reading about the car, we know Doris was the boss at their place (grin).

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    1. Charlie was a big kid, and Doris kept him in line. I remember my mother giving us instructions before going to visit Charlie and Doris for a Sunday dinner.

      "Don't ask Charlie to pass the potatoes."
      "Why?"
      "Because he will throw the potato like a football. IF you want something say Please, may I have some potatoes?"

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  2. LOL "Don't ask Charlie to pass the potatoes!" Now that's funny! :)

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    1. Charlie was a practical joker. You had to be very careful around him. :-D

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  3. sounds like Charlie was a good influence for your dad, and someone he looked up to; it's nice to have that when you're young; other than say father, gram pa, big brother, etc. ! ☺☺♥♥

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    1. Charlie, and his wife, Doris, were very important to my dad

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  4. Monopoly always takes a long time...no wonder he was late😉

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    1. I think he like being out of the house.

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  5. I'm glad to read about the fun in your Dad's life. Times were different but at least there wasn't all the drinking and especially drugs the way there is now. I know people still drank then, but it was different I think. Nice passage this week. I enjoyed it. Hugs-Erika

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    1. Though times were bleak, there were bright spots with the help of people like Charlie who were concerned for young people.

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