Tuesday, June 19, 2018

T Stands for Another Cemetery Hop - Part 1

Works schedules made it difficult for my friend, Teague, and I to get together. A month ago we found a date which worked for both of us. Weather predictions were humid with a 50% chance of showers/thunderstorms.

When I got to her house, we decided what we should do for the day.

"What do you want to do, Marty?"

"I don't know. What do you want to do, Marty?"

Teague told me she had been in the town of Dover at the Highland St. Cemetery to look for some ancestors on her mother's side. She said she thought I would really like to see this cemetery.

She had me at cemetery so off we went.

Teague want to stop at the cemetery office to see if she could find the plot where her family was located. In her genealogy search, she had found section numbers, but when she first visited the cemetery, there were no section markings and since it was a Sunday, no one around to ask for a map.

GPS sent us down a dead end road and announced we had arrived at our destination. Teague said the office was in a garage across from the cemetery. Across the way, we could see what looked like a garage building, but like a lot of things in New England, "Ya can't get theyah from heah."

Teague found the way out, and we were across from the cemetery so she drove in and parked.

The front end of the cemetery was the oldest part. The cemetery wasn't large. So we split up and walked along the front half of the cemetery looking for the grave of her relatives.


I was charmed by the pansy carved on this stone for a beloved sister.


Teague searched her half.


I liked the Old English/Gothic lettering on this stone along with the shell motifs.


Many of the graves in this area were from the Revolutionary War  (1775 -1783), War of 1812 (1812-14), and Civil War (1861-1865)


This family plot was surrounded by a beautiful fence. Wrought iron?


Weeping willow detail 


Urn gate post.


Slate stone from 1778 with a typical Angel of Death motif 



This Death Head between the two columns reminded me of the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz.


Around Memorial Day, flags are placed at the graves of Veterans. This man was a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Rusty, the supervisor of this cemetery, also plants geraniums at the veterans graves.


Another death head.


Lamb marking the grave of a child


This grave marks a veteran who served in the French and Indian War (1756 -1763)



This young man passed away in 1891. His age is listed in years, months, and days which was common for these early stones.


A handsome Old English B. The slate gravestones of the earlier graves didn't weather as well as this granite stone.


The Doctor? Doctor, who? (His soon her name is not Doctor Who. That's a running gag. Doctor, who? His/her name is The Doctor. And the grave is on Tranzelore)


A beautiful monument to a beloved daughter. A hand clutches a beautiful rose.

We had wandered halfway through the cemetery and Teague couldn't find the graves she was looking for. Fortunately, Rusty, the supervisor, was taking care of the grounds. He offered his services and went to the garage to find the area on a map, and then to the office two times (because Teague had misread lot numbers) to find the grave records.
This cemetery is very well maintained, and we told him how nice the grounds looked. He said he usually does more planting, but the late snows in March and cold April prevented him from getting flowers in.

After wandering through the new part of the cemetery (you'll see that over the next two weeks as I took a lot of photographs), we stopped at Murphy's Eats and Treats in Ashland.




My refreshing Raspberry Lime Rickey. Teague had a root beer


I had a freshly made, bacon cheeseburger with crinkle fries. Teague knows the drill (Don't eat!) and waited for me to take a picture.

Drop by hosts, Bleubeard and Elizabeth's blog to find out what the rest of the T Stands For gang is up to. If you want to play, include in your Tuesday post a beverage or container for a beverage. Don't forget to link your blog to Bleubeard and Elizabeth's page.

37 comments:

  1. Gosh that was lovely CJ.... I haven't strolled around a cemetery in years.. Hubby doesn't do that sort of thing.. I spent many happy childhood days wandering around an old cemetery in Easton , PA.. Peeking in mausoleums .. marveling at the some beautiful headstones.. Some headstones tell stories and it was fun to try to decipher the writing.. I remember seeing some with the years, months and days.. It struck me as odd and beautiful at the same times.. I found cemeteries peaceful and not creepy... Thank you CJ... and your food is making me hungry before coffee.. lol Happy T day! Hugs! deb

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    1. Himself doesn't quite get the happiness of wandering through a cemetery, either. :-D

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  2. That's a wonderful cemetery you visited, I love doing things like that, too. Your food and drink looks fabulous, too. Happy T Day, hugs, Valerie

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    1. There's just so much art to look at in a cemetery

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  3. I thoroughly enjoyed your walk thru the cemetery as I have always loved cemeteries too- especially the ones in Europe-just fascinating! Your cool drink especially sounds very refreshing. Happy T day!

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    1. I'll have to put a European cemetery hop on my bucket list.

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  4. What an amazing cemetery, the headstones are wonderful and I so enjoyed looking round with you 😁. I'd love to try a Lime Rickey, it looks so refreshing and your burger and fries looks delish too! Happy T Day! J 😊 x

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    1. Wait until the next 2 T Days. Some really beautiful headstones coming up.

      A Raspberry Lime Rickey is very easy to make. The base is club soda and ice, I suppose you can use sparkling water, too. Add lime juice to taste. Raspberry syrup to taste. Garnish with lime. Mmmm. refreshing. If you want a grown up version add some gin. :-D

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    2. thanks for the recipe sounds like the perfect summer beverage

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  5. I think some of these old cemetery head stones are really awesome. Beautiful;y carved and historic.

    Your lunch looked delish! I swear one day I will try one of those raspberry line rickey's!

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  6. Cemeteries are such lovely places! Usually so peaceful and serene. And so interesting...the old ones at least. One of my favorite memories is of wandering through an old one on Groton, Conn.....in a snow storm....it was amazing!

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    1. I have never been to a cemetery in a snow storm. Getting me outside in snow would be amazing, indeed. :-D

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  7. I really enjoyed this post CJ I hope in the next posts your friend finds her relatives.
    I love that someone who really cares is looking after this cemetery-especially for the veterans-if you see him again thank him for me please.
    Your cheeseburger and fries looks delicious and so does your drink.
    Happy T Day Hugs Kathy

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    1. He seemed pleased and surprised when we told Rusty how nice the cemetery looked. We've been to many cemeteries and some aren't maintained very well.

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    2. sadly thats the majority I am sad to say

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  8. All the history - wow. There are some beautiful head stones there and the wrought iron fence was incredible. Thank you for the tour, CJ.

    I have an India ink question, if you don't mind. I have a set of Dr. Ph. Martin. I'm running out of white and black and need to order more. Do you recommend a different brand?

    Happy T-Day! hugs, Eileen

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    1. I've never used India ink as it is too thick to go through my broad-edged pens (or so I have been told). I have used Dr. Ph Martin's Spectralite Gold and Silver which are excellent metallic inks for writing and painting. I would imagine the Martin India Ink line would be of the same high quality. For waterproof opaque, I use Ziller Acrylic ink for writing as it goes through a broad-edge as well as a pointed pen. I've never used the acrylic ink to paint with. For painting I either use gouache, watercolor, of if it needs to be waterproof, I use acrylic paint. Hope this helps.

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  9. I love old cemeteries, but here in the south I don't ever see ones that old. It's gratifying to see it so well-kept. Fascinating! Your meal would make a hit in our family :) Happy T Tuesday!

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    1. It was nice to be able to tell the Supervisor he was doing a great job.

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  10. When I was an undergrad, I needed three credit hours of independent research. I wanted to research cemeteries because I had so many photos of ones I had visited all over the country. I had trouble finding a professor to sponsor the project because they all thought I was crazy or morbid. Thankfully one prof was also into cemeteries, so I got my project finished. I had NO idea I was NOT ALONE in my joy of visiting and photographing cemeteries until Johanna visited them in her T posts. Now I don't feel so bad saying how wonderful they are. Many of the ones you shared today were fabulous and I appreciated the beauty of them, especially "Lizzie."

    Your meal looks decent, except for the ketchup (grin). That lime rickey sounds refreshing and looks so colorful, too. Thanks for sharing these graves and your lime rickey with us for T this Tuesday.

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    1. I keep telling Himself how many people are interested in the cemeteries. He thinks we're all morbid :-D

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  11. this cemetery is well maintained; very respectful. this is interesting you found the graves dating back as far as you did. my mom and I were trying to find her, have to think a minute, her "great" grandfather once, and we knew the approximate location of his stone. we found everyone but his { the families stones all laid flat against the grass } after much continued searching and a feeling of ...we give up.... we've been here 10 years...I happened to look down and criss cross of where we stood...and sure enough, there was gram pa barry...sorta out in left field...we were beginning to think he'd done something "bad" and was banished from the rest of the family's spot !!!!! ☺☺♥♥

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    1. Poor Grampa Barry. Maybe his being out in left field might have more to do with how plots were laid out and who paid for them. That's where it's helpful if there's a cemetery office and someone to look up information about the grave site.

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  12. These are amazing photos of your visit to the cemetery. It looks so well maintained and such an amount of history on the stones.
    Your burger looked delicious.
    Happy T day wishes.
    Yvonne xx

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    1. Since Boston and surrounding areas go back to the time of the Pilgrims (1620), there's lots of history all over the place.

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  13. incredible photos..what a great post:)

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  14. That looks like a cool old cemetery. My daughter used to live near one that seemed similar and I used to go over and walk with her round the grounds. I think you and Teague had a nice day out and boy, that lunch looks right up my alley. Yum. Hope it was great T day. Hugs-Erika

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  15. I have never been to a cemetery to explore because frankly that is not my idea of a great time but those head stones are very beautiful and unique. I may have to change my idea of a good time.
    And your food looks so yummy by the way!
    Happy Tea Day,
    Kate

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    1. I love the artwork of the stones especially the older stones which were carved by hand.

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  16. We call it cemetery surfing over here. I have loved exploring cemeteries since I was sixteen and visited New Orleans. In their cemeteries the people are all buried in tombs above ground, because of the low sea level of New Orleans. So lots of interesting tombs.
    I look forward to seeing the rest of this one.
    Oh, and the food looks yummy! Happy T Day!

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  17. What a gorgeous cemetery! I love old grave stones! I think it's so special, that flowers are planted at the veterans graves. Sad about the lamb! This cemetery is so well kept!

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